Github: Step by step management of Github with Git Cola GUI

Github Git Cola GUI: Stage, Comment and Commit changes

Github and Git Cola GUI combination make VCS easy to manage, fun and productive. As stated in a previous post, Github doesn’t have an official UI app for Linux. Continue reading «Github: Step by step management of Github with Git Cola GUI»

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iQunix 11.04 released and ready to rock !


After just a month or two with the announcement and the success of iQunix 10.10, I am pleased to announce the availability of iQunix OS v11.04. This version will be supported with system maintenance updates till Oct. 2013. This new release as usual is based on Ubuntu 11.04 and as user interface uses Gnome 2 (no Unity no Gnome Shell by default) Continue reading «iQunix 11.04 released and ready to rock !»

Video: Latest version of 2Click Update in action


Its been almost 5 months since I released the v5.7 of 2Click Update and never thought that it really needs something new to add. It works like as it should be. It is better than your classic Update Manager. You run it and it deals with the rest of its job (update package list, install upgrades, remove obsolete dependencies, free disk space etc.) without bothering user with confirmation dialogs that he would already answer yes. Over all 2Click Update counts 2700 downloads and just the 1023 times are only from the 5.7 version. Since its first release it has been translated to 20 Languages. (thanks Simos, for the initial internationalization!). So why should I release a new version of something that just works ? Continue reading «Video: Latest version of 2Click Update in action»

Mark Shuttleworth Octomber 2010 Keynote


Mark Shuttleworth, founder of Canonical and Ubuntu delivers the keynote speech in the Ubuntu Developer Summit in Orlando, Florida. The next version of Ubuntu 11.04 will be called Natty Narwhal. The name follows the usual Ubuntu naming tradition of the codename consisting of an adjective and a name of an animal starting with the same letter, and following an alphabetic order. Also Ubuntu 11.04 will ship a with a desktop-oriented form factor of Unity in its desktop edition instead of the GNOME desktop environment.

Enough with talks. Enjoy the keynote:

 

Open Office 3.0


Open Office 3.0

StarDivision, the original author of the StarOffice suite of software, was founded in Germany in the mid-1980s. It was acquired by Sun Microsystems during the summer of 1999 and StarOffice 5.2 was released in June of 2000. Future versions of StarOffice software, beginning with 6.0, have been built using the OpenOffice.org source, APIs, file formats, and reference implementation with Sun’s sponsorship who is the primary contributor of code to OpenOffice.org. CollabNet hosts the website infrastructure for development of the product and helps manage the project.

Nowadays, OpenOffice.org is the leading open-source office software suite for word processing, spreadsheets, presentations, graphics, databases and more. It is available in many languages and works on all common computers. It stores all your data in an international open standard format and can also read and write files from other common office software packages. It can be downloaded and used completely free of charge.
Many of the new features of the latest version, are only noticeable depending on how much of the OpenOffice suite you use. If you’re a rebel and you use it in your work environment when everybody else is still on Microsoft Office, the compatibility with Office 2007/2008 file formats is hard to ignore. Finally getting native support for DOCX and XLSX, for example, is long overdue and the formats are now seamlessly integrated. However, OpenOffice can not yet save files in the new MS Office format.

The new Start Center should appeal only to users who like having a landing page or only want to have one link on their desktop. It opens up a slightly redesigned window that highlights all of the OpenOffice tools with big icons. I find the Quickstarter to be a more effective and less intrusive way to do the same thing. Unfortunately, the interface within each program in the suite has gone largely unchanged. It looks fine when compared with MS Office 2003, but not so much when up against the Office 2007/2008.

Other improvements to the two most-used programs in OpenOffice include multiple page viewing, improved notes and commenting, and improved PDF creation and importation in Writer, and a Solver feature and spreadsheet sharing in Calc. Most of these changes bring OpenOffice up to the new standard of MS Office. Besides the OpenDocument Format support, there’s little here that you can’t get in Office. Of course, the benefit of OpenOffice being freeware can’t be understated.